Life lessons from boat racing – if it is broke fix it

Lets say I am good at putting things off, especially if it means getting all hot and sweaty. That means that things on the boat, especially in the height of summer will get put off until the weather cools. I repeat, I am not good in the heat, and tools and other articles do tend to get airborne after a few expletives when I miss something due to sweat in my eyes. I’m also old enough that I forget where I put tools down and spend a fair amount of time getting pissed off that I can’t find bits.

That being said, there is a point that you need to do things as the level of irritation with a problem become annoying or something is just plain broke. It is the first of these that I want to talk about today, the second is pretty self evident  just go ahead and fix it. The second is a little more pernicious, both in life and on the water.

For most of this season I have not been particularly happy with the boat handing. We just have a bit too much weather helm when the wind pipes up, It isn’t that anything is broken, it just isn’t working as well as it should. When we head off up wind, the rudder is too far off the center line and we have more drag than we should. The fix is to change the balance of the boat and move the center of effort of the sail plan forward. This shouldn’t be a  difficult job, but it is the first time that I have done this on this boat, so there is always a risk of things going awry. The other factor is that the furling on this boat isn’t a current model so getting replacement parts could be a little difficult if things go bubbles.

So, guess what, I’ve been putting it off and living with a sub-par situation. That is called procrastination, and it isn’t a good thing. It can happen for a lot of reasons – for me it is when I’m uncertain of obtaining the outcome I want.

So the trick is to figure out what needs to be done by whatever means necessary and attempt to disaster proof your plan before you start. In this case I found a really useful youtube video that walked me through the process. I had read the manual as well and with both of these I felt that it wasn’t beyond my capabilities. If it is beyond your capabilities, then at this point stop, do not pass go and get the right help, as failure will reinforce your procrastination in the future.

Next is to make a detailed plan of what you need to do the job and the steps involved, and a place to store your tools when you are working. Go through from beginning to the end, and  then you won’t find yourself in the situation where everything is apart all over the dock and you are running around looking for the tool you forgot to bring or have temporarily misplaced. I had both a mental and physical check list before I left to start work.

Now work your plan. Don’t skip steps and if things are struggling, then step back and regroup. I had to do this a couple of times when I ran into issues but in the end I had disaster proofed my plan well enough that nothing went sideways and now I’m on to the last step which is test and test again to ensure I have achieved my objective.

By the way, even with all of the planning I did forget one tool and had to improvise. It was something that I didn’t even think of during the planning process so it was a case of not knowing what I didn’t know. Next time I do this adjustment, I won’t have this surprise, but all in all I’m happy with how things went.